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Recent Knowledge on Soul Beat

Publication Date
Publication Date: 
Tuesday, September 26, 2017

This book explores approaches to preventing all forms of violence against children from the perspectives of Islam and Christianity. These faiths place great value on children and the importance of raising them in a safe, protective, and morally sound environment so that they may realise their rights to live, grow, develop, and be active members of society. In that context, Al-Azhar University and the Coptic Church of Egypt joined together with the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) to compile this guide for all those who work in the wide field of caring for and protecting children, including parents, servants, teachers, educators, imams, priests, and others.

Languages: 

English; Arabic

Number of Pages: 

52 (English); 51 (Arabic)

Contacts (user reference): 
UNICEF - Public...
Source: 

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Publication Date
Year: 
2017

This how-to guide was developed to support professionals from National Malaria Control Programs (NMCPs), health promotion units, technical working groups, and implementing partners to monitor and evaluate social and behaviour change communication (SBCC) activities that support case management. As explained in the toolkit, "case management of malaria has changed a great deal since the introduction and widespread use of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) and artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). These changes demand shifts in the way individuals, households, communities, and service providers think about malaria case management. Prompt care seeking for fever continues to be emphasized by SBCC campaigns, but families are now being asked to demand for a test before seeking medication. Service providers are being asked to replace clinical diagnosis of febrile patients with blood testing.

  <div class="field button"><a href="https://sbccimplementationkits.org/malaria-case-management/" target="_blank">Click here to access this I-Kit online.</a></div>
Cost: 
Free to download
Languages: 

English

Contacts (user reference): 
kbose

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Publication Date
Publication Date: 
Thursday, June 1, 2017

Launched in 1991, the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) is a global effort by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) to implement practices that protect, promote, and support breastfeeding in health facilities to foster mother and child bonding. Hospitals undergo a process of planning, training, and policy changes that lead to achieving 11 key criteria. The tenth step (or criterion) of the BFHI is: Foster the establishment of breastfeeding support groups and refer mothers to them on discharge from the hospital or clinic.

Languages: 

English, Russian

Number of Pages: 

78 (English); 86 (Russian)

Contacts (user reference): 
jnicholson77
Source: 

SPRING website, October 4 2017. Image credit: SPRING/Kyrgyz Republic

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Prevention+ is a five-year (2016-2020) multi-country programme that envisions a world where healthy, respectful, and equal relationships are the norm. To achieve its objectives, the programme addresses the root causes of gender-based violence – the social, economic, religious, and cultural contexts that shape attitudes and behaviour that lead to violence. “In a world where many countries have come to enshrine women's rights and support for gender equality in policy and practice, gender-based violence (GBV), specifically violence against women and girls, still persist. This is because this violence, whether at home or in public, is rooted in gender-based discrimination, inequitable gender norms, and imbalanced power dynamics.” For this reason, the Prevention+ project seeks to transform the social norms and values that enable GBV, and to encourage care, respect, and equality.

Communication Strategies: 

In order to foster positive interactions and gender-equitable relationships to address the root causes of GBV, the programme:

  1. takes a multi-level approach: that is, designing interventions at four levels of society - individual (individuals enjoy violence-free and gender just relations), community (communities promote gender equitable norms and prevent GBV), institutional (public institutions and civil society organisations promote gender justice and prevent GBV), and government (laws and policies promote gender justice and engage boys and men to prevent GBV) to transform the intersecting social and structural factors that allow GBV to persist; and
  2. actively engages young and adult men as part of the solution. Because GBV occurs most often in the context of relationships, prevention requires a collaborative effort. As part of its approach, Prevention+ engages young and adult men as partners and advocates for change - alongside young and adult women - to challenge and transform harmful gender norms and practices.

The ultimate aim of Prevention+ is to contribute to the adoption and implementation of national-level policies and systems of evidence-based programming for violence prevention that are sustained well beyond the initial five-year programme.

In the countries where Prevention+ is active, the programme undertakes the following key activities:

  • recruiting the support of trusted community and faith-based leaders to serve as role models of gender-equitable norms, thereby influencing gender-equitable norms and values in the community (community level);
  • training institutional staff of government ministries, government representatives, service providers, and civil society to integrate gender-transformative approaches in their day-to-day work. This includes equipping staff with the tools and know-how necessary to interact with young and adult men, women, and couples in a manner free from discrimination and bias (institutional level);
  • engaging young and adult men and women in comprehensive GBV prevention programmes offered in partnership with existing community service organisation efforts. For example, through co-facilitated conversations on GBV prevention, young and adult men and women together begin to think and talk about gender equality, sexuality, and non-violent relationships (individual level);
  • advocacy efforts that focus on encouraging (inter)national governments to introduce and enact new legislation aimed at preventing and eliminating GBV, and to strengthen enforcement of existing policies or legislation (government level).

The following are examples of activities that are being undertaken by Prevention+ programme in implementing countries:

  • In Rwanda, the Rwanda Men’s Resource Center (RWAMREC) seeks to institutionalise gender-transformative approaches to GBV prevention within existing structures by working together with the government and local leaders. The programme works with young men and women in schools through Boys4Change clubs and with couples through evening dialogue sessions called Umugoroba w’Ababyeyi, a government-supported initiative that brings men and women together to discuss community issues.
  • In Uganda, Reproductive Health Uganda (RHU) holistically addresses the structural and systemic drivers that allow all forms of GBV to persist. RHU engages with men and boys to prevent GBV, and with the Center for Domestic Violence Prevention (CEDOVIP) and Center for Health, Human Rights and Development (CEHURD) to use lessons learnt in communities to advance national advocacy for GBV prevention.
  • Rutgers Pakistan is conducting the International Men and Gender Equality Survey (IMAGES), in collaboration with the Population Council, Rozan (a national non-governmental organisation, or NGO), and the Ministry of Human Rights. With its partners, the joint initiative aims to provide the evidence needed to strengthen the implementation of laws focused on reducing GBV, and seeks to create an environment supportive of engaging with men to end GBV.
  • In Indonesia, Rutgers Indonesia has partnered with Rifka Annisa and Damar women crisis centres, the Pulih Foundation, and Rahima Foundation (a feminist faith-based organisation) to improve overall service delivery. Together, they introduce gender-transformative approaches in community education activities, GBV counselling, and policy advocacy. Rahima Foundation encourages religious leaders to champion equal gender perspectives and healthy relationships within the context of their teachings and marriage courses.
  • In the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), gender equality is a topic of longstanding debate; however, little research has explored how social norms related to masculinity perpetuate GBV and conflict. Promundo, UN Women, and their research partners have begun examining these themes through IMAGES research in Egypt, Lebanon, Morocco, and Palestine. IMAGES findings will influence related evidence-based advocacy and action at national and regional levels. In the coming years, a Regional Training Initiative will help civil society and public sector participants build a regional network of future leaders and gender-justice advocates.
Development Issues: 

Gender-based Violence

Key Points: 

Context:
1 in 3 women experience physical or sexual violence, most often by an intimate partner. Between 133 and 275 million children witness violence in their homes, per year. An estimated 3.7% of gross domestic product (GDP) is lost due to GBV: this is more than double what governments spend on education.

Partner Text: 

Rutgers, Promundo, and Sonke Gender Justice, MenEngage Alliance, and Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands.

Contacts (user reference): 
Rutgers
Promundo
Sonke Gender Ju...

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VACANT POST - BASIC INFORMATION
Organisation: 
UNICEF
Location: 

Nairobi, Kenya

Reference Number (optional): 
507145
Application Deadline (optional): 
October 6, 2017

Job Number: 507145 | Vacancy Link
Locations: Africa: Kenya
Work Type : Fixed Term Staff

UNICEF works in 190 countries and territories to protect the rights of every child. UNICEF has spent 70 years working to improve the lives of children and their families. Defending children's rights throughout their lives requires a global presence, aiming to produce results and understand their effects. UNICEF believes all children have a right to survive, thrive and fulfill their potential – to the benefit of a better world.

For every child, a fair chance

Submission Instructions: 
ADMIN INFORMATION
Contacts (user reference): 
Rafael Obregón

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Launched in November 2016 to coincide with the United Nations (UN)-designated International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women, Oxfam's Enough campaign focuses on shifting harmful social norms that condone and perpetuate violence against women and girls. It kick-started campaigns in Morocco, Indonesia, India, Pakistan, Guatemala, South Africa, and Zambia (Bolivia joined on Valentine's Day 2017) - with more than 30 countries expected to join over time, mobilising citizens and decision-makers to challenge the discrimination that drives abuse against women and girls. The campaign seeks to help individuals and communities understand the drivers and enablers of violence and build their capacity to say "Enough" to harmful attitudes and behaviours.

Communication Strategies: 

Oxfam International is testing campaigning methodologies and integrating these into programmatic interventions to challenge negative social norms. Several country-specific examples of campaign endeavours follows below. But one technique being used across the countries is the engagement being fostered through the telling of stories on the Enough website of people standing up and speaking out against the idea that violence toward women and girls is normal behaviour. There, too, people are being asked to watch and share the Enough campaign video to show why it is time to #SayEnough to violence against women and girls.

Examples of country-specific activities:

In Pakistan, the campaign was launched at Pir Mehr Ali Shah Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi, in an event organised by Oxfam in partnership with Aurat Foundation. It featured a rickshaw drive in 24 districts, across Punjab and Sindh provinces, in which more than 3,000 rickshaws driven by advocates for women's rights displayed campaign messages, carried artwork, and played feminist folk songs. The accompanying ceremony, featuring speakers like the Chairperson of the National Commission on the Status of Women, was attended by representatives of civil society, diplomats, media, academia, and students of Arid Agriculture University.

Oxfam India (OIN) launched its campaign Bano Nayi Soch: Buno Hinsa Mukt Rishtey (Be a New Thought: Weave Violence Free Lives) on November 25 2016, followed by state-level launches and campaign interventions during the 16 Days of Activism and International Women’s Day. For example, OIN participated in the International Women's Day strike, which was organised by women's rights organisations in Delhi. OIN staff wore red, and an out-of-office mail was posted by staff on their respective emails to show solidarity with the strike. Staff actively participated in an engaging internal conversation on how gender friendly is Oxfam India. The overall positive norm the campaign is focussing on is "Mutually respectful, equal and nurturing relationships which are always free of any kind of violence". The campaign is currently being implemented in 385 villages in 33 districts in 5 states of India (Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Odisha and Uttar Pradesh). The intended group of the campaign is young people in the age group of 13 to 29 years.

Other OIN campaign strategies:

  • Two major partnerships where OIN promoted its campaign are the Global Citizen (GC) Festival and the Mumbai Film Festival. Oxfam India helped the GC Festival team develop gender-based actions that young people could undertake to win an entry to the GC music concert. The concert had many Indian and foreign celebrities from the film and music industry. The main attraction was Coldplay. The Festival was also used as a platform to generate awareness online and during the concert on social norms underpinning domestic violence.
  • OIN in partnership with Mumbai Film Festival, 2016 offered an award called Oxfam Best Film on Gender Equality. The award went to the movie "Lipstick under my Burqa", directed by Alankrita Shrivastava. The film was denied the necessary certification for commercial release on the grounds that it was "lady-oriented". After a long controversial battle and with 11 international awards on its back, it was finally released in India in July 2017. During the censorship ban, OIN stood by the film and created online engagement around the issues of women's autonomy. Prior to the release of the film in July 2017, OIN along with the filmmaker and the cast organised a pre-release event. The event included a panel discussion on the theme "The Influence of Film on Gender Norms". Among other panelists, the panel consisted of the director of the film. Moderated by a well-known film critic, the event was held in collaboration with the American Center in Delhi. OIN had commissioned a research to understand the influence and impact films had in the communities where OIN worked. The research findings were disseminated during the event.
  • In 2018, OIN will focus on the campaign theme "Respect for Women's Autonomy in decision making within the family and community". The aim is to reach 3.3 million people using a range of interventions, such as holding campaign spikes and public events, developing technology platforms, building capacities of women rights organsiations and networks, and working with youth and women collectives.

In Bolivia, as part of Enough, the Collective Rebellion, the Women's Coordinator, and Oxfam have come together to understand the social norms that reproduce machismo (hyper-masculinity that values, among other things, aggression) and leads to violence against women and girls. To fully understand young people's relationships, collaborators used a participatory research methodology and engaged 220 young people organised by 15 groups of activists in the cities of La Paz, El Alto, and Santa Cruz. These young people reflected on current conceptualisations of romantic love that are used to control women in relationships and shared ideas on how to challenge these conceptualisations. These ideas came to life in the campaign ACTUA, which is centred on challenging violence in young people's social networks and creating groups of young people who question violence. Campaigning methodologies include public events discussing a new vision of love based on foundations of freedom and equality and videos on social media that highlight the problem of indifference to violence in dating relationships (the most popular video has been viewed more than 600,000 times on Facebook). They have also built a strategic alliance with the open television channel RED UNO in its young people's programme BIGOTE. The campaign has involved public figures and celebrities, and young people have organised activities (concerts, mural painting, song contests, graffiti, sports activities) and encouraged a wide range of young people to join the campaign.

In July 2017, Oxfam Papua New Guinea, through its gender justice programme, ran a week-long workshop in Port Moresby to develop a "Stop violence against women" campaign strategy. The workshop, attended by 25 participants representing Oxfam's partner organisations from around the country, not only sought to enhance understanding of behaviour that leads to violence against women but also to create a campaign strategy and identify platforms that can be used to advocate behavioural change.

Development Issues: 

Violence against Women and Girls

Key Points: 

Oxfam observes that women and girls face violence throughout their lives: More than 700 million women alive today were married as children, 200 million women and girls have undergone female genital mutilation - with the majority of girls being cut before the age of 5 - and 30% of women will experience intimate partner violence. Studies have found higher rates of violence among women experiencing multiple discriminations, including indigenous women, lesbian and bisexual women, and women with disabilities.

No single factor alone causes partner violence; however, evidence shows [PDF] that one of the strongest factors that predicts this form of abuse is discriminatory shared beliefs (social norms) about what is normal and appropriate in relationships. These can include that a man has a right to assert power over a woman or that a man has a right to discipline women. Unhealthy relationships often start early - with young men and women thinking behaviours such as teasing and name calling are normal parts of relationships. Societies across the world promote masculine jealously and control as a desirable way to demonstrate love. Films, music, soap operas reinforce these ideas, as can parents and friends.

Some findings on Enough campaign reach:

  • To date, the ACTUA campaign in Bolivia has reached 22,000 people who discussed the issues on social media and shared messages among their friends and, above all, expressed their willingness to actively act against violence. The campaign has a group of about 50 activists who provoke reflection among their peers and contribute to the change of ideas and beliefs about violence against women and girls.
  • OIN's consolidated outreach (where people have heard the message at least once) for 2016-17, which includes both online and on-the-ground activities, is 3.5 million. The engagement outreach (in terms of signing of the pledges and some preliminary action on social media) is 1.27 million.
Contacts (user reference): 
BethanCansfield
See video
Source: 

Emails from Bethan Cansfield to The Communication Initiative on August 25 2017 and October 9 2017; and Enough page on the Oxfam website; Enough website; Enough press release, November 24 2016; "'Enough is enough': Oxfam launches massive campaign against VAW", The Express Tribune, November 30 2016; "Oxfam campaign gives hope to women", The National, July 14 2017; and Nigerian Women's Trust Fund website - all accessed on September 22 2017.

Publication Date
Tuesday, November 1, 2016

“In many countries in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), mental health issues are poorly understood. They are often attributed to laziness, and in severe cases spiritual possession or bewitchment. There are very few services available to help people struggling with mental health issues, and the ones that are available often focus on the most severe mental illnesses with little attention given to common mood disorders such as Depression, bipolar, and anxiety disorders.”

  <div class="field button"><a href="https://publications.farmradio.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/117-MH-final-radio-outcome-evaluation-report.pdf" target="_blank">Click here to download this 23-page report in PDF format.</a></div>
Contacts (user reference): 
Farm Radio Inte...
Source: 

Farm Radio International website on October 10 2017.

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Publication Date
Publication Date: 
Friday, November 20, 2015

The International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance (International IDEA) observes that electoral management bodies (EMBs) have noted stakeholders' increasing reliance on social media throughout the electoral cycle but have also voiced concerns about the potential use of social media to spread hate speech, misinformation, and rumours. This document provides general guidance for EMBs and other stakeholders, including political parties, candidates, citizen journalists, and other social media commentators, seeking to reach agreement on a code of etiquette for the publication and dissemination of election-related news and information via social media.

The first section discusses the definitions of social media and election-related content. This discussion aims to highlight some of the considerations for stakeholders who are attempting to draft definitions that are suitable to their own environments.

Publisher: 
Number of Pages: 

18

Source: 

International IDEA website, June 26 2017. Image credit: TechnologySalon

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Publication Date
Year: 
2017

This how-to guide was developed to support professionals from National Malaria Control Programs (NMCPs), health promotion units, technical working groups, and implementing partners to monitor and evaluate social and behaviour change communication (SBCC) activities that support case management. As explained in the toolkit, "case management of malaria has changed a great deal since the introduction and widespread use of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) and artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). These changes demand shifts in the way individuals, households, communities, and service providers think about malaria case management. Prompt care seeking for fever continues to be emphasized by SBCC campaigns, but families are now being asked to demand for a test before seeking medication. Service providers are being asked to replace clinical diagnosis of febrile patients with blood testing.

  <div class="field button"><a href="https://sbccimplementationkits.org/malaria-case-management/" target="_blank">Click here to access this I-Kit online.</a></div>
Cost: 
Free to download
Languages: 

English

Contacts (user reference): 
kbose

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Author: 
Sandra Sáenz de Tejada
María Elena Figueroa
Publication Date
2017

This document is a summary of a longer report, originally written in Spanish, sharing the results of an investigation to identify the normative and behavioural factors influencing infant nutrition and feeding and sanitation practices in the Western Highlands region of Guatemala. It emerges from the West Highlands Integrated Program (WHIP), wherein the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Guatemala asked the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Program (CCP)'s Health Communication Capacity Collaborative (HC3) to provide technical assistance. (Further information about this project is available at Related Summaries, below.) Part of this technical assistance consists of supporting the development of a social and behaviour change communication (SBCC) strategy designed to contribute to positive change in existing norms and key behaviours related to chronic malnutrition.

  <div class="field button"><a href="http://healthcommcapacity.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Expanding-Our-Horizons-Research-Summary.pdf" 0="s:6:&quot;a:0:{}&quot;;" target="_blank">Click here for the 8-page brief in PDF format.</a></div>
Contacts (user reference): 
kbose
Source: 

HC3 website, September 28 2017. Image credit: © 2017, Patricia Poppe

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Soul Beat Africa: Democracy and Governance Network