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Attitudes about Vaccines to Prevent Ebola Virus Disease in Guinea at the End of a Large Ebola Epidemic: Results of a National Household Survey

Attitudes about Vaccines to Prevent Ebola Virus Disease in Guinea at the End of a Large Ebola Epidemic: Results of a National Household Survey

Author: 
Kathleen L. Irwin
Mohamed F. Jalloh
Jamaica Corker
Barry Alpha Mahmoud
Susan J. Robinson
Wenshu Li
Nyuma E. James
Musa Sellu
Mohammad B. Jalloh
Alpha Ahmadou Diallo
LaRee Tracy
Rana Hajjeh
Amanda VanSteelandt
Rebecca Bunnell
Lise Martel
Pratima L. Raghunathan
Barbara Marston
The 2015 Guinean Household Survey of Ebola Virus Disease Project Group
Publication Date
Saturday, July 15, 2017
Affiliation: 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC (Irwin, Robinson, Li, Hajjeh, VanSteelandt, Bunnell, Martel, Raghunathan, Marston); Focus 1000 (M.F. Jalloh, James, Sellu, M.B. Jalloh); Consultant to the CDC (Corker); Santé Plus (Mahmoud); Ministry of Health, Conakry, Guinea (Diallo); Food and Drug Administration, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (Tracy)

From March 2014 to May 2016, Guinea suffered a large, national Ebola virus disease epidemic in which 3,814 confirmed, probable, or suspected cases and 2,544 deaths were reported. The government of Guinea's National Coordination for the Fight against Ebola collaborated with partner organisations to increase the public's knowledge about Ebola and to promote life-saving prevention practices; for example, mass media, community events, and door-to-door campaigns spread information about Ebola causes and transmission and advised prompt symptom reporting and avoiding contact with sick people and corpses. As the epidemic waned in August 2015, several organisations collaborated to conduct a national household survey that evaluated the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) related to the epidemic response and attitudes about hypothetical Ebola vaccines that might inform future use of experimental or licensed Ebola vaccines. This article shares the results of the KAP survey.

  <div class="field button"><a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.06.026" target="_blank">Click here to read the article online or to download it in PDF format (9 pages).</a></div>
Contacts (user reference): 
Source: 

Vaccine Volume 35, Issue 49, Part B, December 14 2017, Pages 6915-6923. Image credit: Cellou Binani/AFP/Getty

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