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Improving Hepatitis B Birth Dose Coverage through Village Health Volunteer Training and Pregnant Women Education

Improving Hepatitis B Birth Dose Coverage through Village Health Volunteer Training and Pregnant Women Education

Author: 
Xi Li
James Heffelfinger
Eric Wiesen
Sergey Diorditsa
Jayaprakash Valiakolleri
Agnes Bauro Nikuata
Ezekial Nukuro
Beia Tabwaia
Joseph Woodring
Publication Date
Wednesday, July 5, 2017
Affiliation: 

World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for the Western Pacific (Li, Heffelfinger, Diorditsa, Woodring); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC (Wiesen); WHO Country Office, Fiji (Valiakolleri); Expanded Programme on Immunization, Ministry of Health & Medical Services, Tungaru Central Hospital (Tabwaia); WHO Country Office, Kiribati (Nikuata, Nukuro)

"The results of this project suggest that coverage of hepatitis B birth dose vaccination can be improved by strengthening the linkage between health workers and communities and by using these groups to educate caregivers."

The major cause of liver cancer globally, chronic hepatitis B infection is highly endemic in the Republic of Kiribati. Meanwhile, the coverage of timely birth dose vaccination, the primary method shown to prevent mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B virus, was only 66% in 2014. Children born at home are especially at high risk, as they have limited access to timely birth dose (i.e., within 24 hours) vaccination. The primary objective of the project described in this article was to assess whether a training package that included educating pregnant women and improving linkages between village health volunteers (VHVs) and health facilities would improve birth dose coverage in areas with low coverage in Kiribati.

  <div class="field button"><a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264410X17308538" target="_blank">Click here to read the article online or to download it in PDF format (6 pages).</a></div>
Contacts (user reference): 
Source: 

Vaccine, Volume 35, Issue 34, 3 August 2017, Pages 4396-4401. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.06.056. Image credit: Gavi/2013/Raj Kumar

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