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Soul Buddyz Club Impact Evaluation

Soul Buddyz Club Impact Evaluation

Date: 
Friday, December 9, 2016

Context and Background:

Methodologies: 

The researchers designed a retrospective cohort study design in order to determine the impact of being a SBC member. The study sample comprised people who were SBC members between 2004 and 2008. Cases comprised individuals aged 18-24 years who attended SBCs approximately 6-10 years ago (2004-2008). Controls were individuals aged 18-24 years who never attended SBC but grew up and attended schools in the same communities. The study interviewed over 900 respondents (300+ cases and 600 controls) between Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal. Interviewers administered a structured questionnaire and captured data using a personal digital assistants (PDAs). 877 interviews were conducted face-to-face, and 39 were conducted telephonically. The research also included anonymous, linked HIV testing with those who agreed to be tested.

The researchers used a multi-pronged recruitment approach to recruit the ex-SBC members. Methods included radio adverts, a Facebook group, WhatsApp, and telephone calls to those identified through snowballing.

The study used multivariate logistic regression analysis to determine impact. Analysis was controlled for sex and age, as well as other covariates that were selected on a basis of theoretical relevance and being independently associated with the outcomes in bivariate analysis.

Access: 

Media Access

The findings showed that respondents used/accessed WhatsApp, TV, and the internet most frequently. Controls were more likely to watch TV every day of the week, while ex-Buddyz were more likely to access Facebook and the internet every day. Controls were less likely to access WhatsApp frequently.

Exposure to Soul Buddyz Clubs

Most ex-Buddyz joined in Grade 5, and the majority were involved for longer than a year. Just under half of ex-Buddyz reported being office bearers (such as a treasurer or a chairperson). The vast majority of respondents had watched the "Soul Buddyz" television series; however, ex-Buddyz were more likely to watch Soul Buddyz “very often” than controls.

Practices: 

Community Participation
Ex-Buddyz were more likely to be involved in their communities and were 4.8 times more likely to participate in community events compared to a control group.

Sexual Behaviour
SBC had an impact on a number of key sexual risk behaviours:

  • Sexual Debut

Ex-Buddyz were less likely to have had sex before 15 years old: 19% control, 12% case.
Ex-Buddyz were less likely to have had sex before 18 years old: 82% control, 70% case.
In a multivariate analysis, there was no significant difference in sexual debut below 15 years for either male or female ex-Buddyz. There was also no significant difference in sexual debut below 18 years for male ex-Buddyz. However, young women who were ex-SBC members were 1.9 times more likely to have waited to have sex until after they were 18 years old.

  • Multiple sexual partners (MSP)

Ex-Buddyz were less likely to have had MSP in the past year compared to a control group: 47% control, 34% case. Put another way, ex-Buddyz were 2.14 times more likely to have had only one partner in the past year.
Ex-Buddyz were less likely to have had MSP in the past month compared to a control group: 14% control, 4% case.
Controlling for age, female ex-Buddyz were less likely to have had MSP in the past 12 months. For male ex-Buddyz, there was no significant difference in MSP in the past 12 months. 

  • Condom use

Ex-Buddyz were 1.68 times more likely to have used a condom at first sex compared to a control group.
Controlling for age, female ex-Buddyz were 1.87 times more likely to have used a condom at first sex. However, there was no significant difference in condom use at first sex for male ex-Buddyz.

Other Impacts: 

HIV infection
Overall, ex-Buddyz were 2.92 times more likely to be HIV-negative.
Female ex-Buddyz were less likely to be HIV positive than a control group: 19% control and 8% case.
For male ex-Buddyz, there was no significant difference in HIV status.

Education
Ex-buddyz were more likely to have completed matric: 62% control and 73% case.
Ex-Buddyz were more likely to have completed Grade 12 or higher.
Controlling for age, female ex-Buddyz were 3.1 times more likely to have a high educational attainment.
For male ex-Buddyz, there was no significant difference in educational attainment.

Employment
Ex-Buddyz were 2.7 times more likely to be employed compared to a control group.

Alcohol and drug use
Ex-Buddyz were less likely to drink at hazardous levels: 47% control and 37% case. However, this was not significant in the multivariate analysis.

Pregnancy
SBC exposure had little impact on pregnancy. Although fewer female ex-Buddyz reported being pregnant (35.29%) compared to controls (46.74%), this was not significant in the multivariate analysis.

Sexually transmitted infections and health seeking behaviour
There was no significant difference in health seeking behaviour in female ex-Buddyz and controls.
Male ex-Buddyz were more likely to have gone to a health facility for assistance than controls.

Gender-based violence
There was no significant difference by exposure to SBC.

Implications for implementation

  • Soul City should continue to promote SBC as a way to reduce HIV risk in young women.
  • They should examine why SBC exposure has not been as effective in the long-term in young men.

Click here for more information in the Powerpoint presentation of the impact evaluation results.

Contacts (user reference): 
Source: 

Soul Buddyz Impact Evaluation - Powerpoint Presentation and "Positve impact of Soul Buddyz Clubs on young women" article on Genesis website on January 16 2018; and "Can Children's clubs Prevent HIV Infection Among Young Women and Girls? A Long-Term Retrospective Cohort Study of the Soul Buddyz Clubs in South Africa" - sent from Sue Goldstein to The Communication Initiative on June 14 2018.

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