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Quality Improvement as a Framework for Behavior Change Interventions in HIV-Predisposed Communities: A Case of Adolescent Girls and Young Women in Northern Uganda

Quality Improvement as a Framework for Behavior Change Interventions in HIV-Predisposed Communities: A Case of Adolescent Girls and Young Women in Northern Uganda

Author: 
Esther Karamagi
Simon Sensalire
Juliana Nabwire
John Byabagambi
Alfred O. Awio
George Aluma
Mirwais Rahimzai
Jacqueline Calnan
Sheila Kyobutungi
Publication Date
Thursday, January 25, 2018
Affiliation: 

USAID Applying Science to Strengthen and Improve Systems (ASSIST) Project (Karamagi, Sensalire,  Nabwire,  Byabagambi, Awio, Aluma, Rahimzai), USAID Uganda (Calnan, Kyobutungi)

"In the past 2 years, a USAID-funded project tested a quality improvement for behavior change model (QBC) to address barriers to behavioral change among adolescent girls and young women (AGYW) at high risk of HIV infection."

This evaluation analyses effectiveness of a model used among Ugandan women and girls designed for skills building to improve ability of AGYW to stop risky behaviour; setting up and empowering community quality improvement (QI) teams to mobilise community resources to support AGYW to stop risky behaviour; and service delivery camps to provide HIV prevention services and commodities to AGYW and other community members. In this post-conflict region following the activities of the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), AGYW were likely to experience at least three or more HIV risk factors in life such as gender-based violence (GBV) including rape, cross-generational sex and early marriage, transactional sex, multiple sexual partnerships, and drug abuse.

  <div class="field button"><a href="https://aidsrestherapy.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12981-018-0190-2" target="_blank">Click here to read the full text of this document online. </a></div>
Contacts (user reference): 
Source: 

AIDS Research and Therapy website of BMC Research, November 1 2018.

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