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The "Empty Void" Is a Crowded Space: Health Service Provision at the Margins of Fragile and Conflict Affected States

The "Empty Void" Is a Crowded Space: Health Service Provision at the Margins of Fragile and Conflict Affected States

Author: 
Peter S. Hill
Enrico Pavignani
Markus Michael
Maurizio Murru
Mark E. Beesley
Publication Date
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
Affiliation: 

University of Queensland (Hill, Pavignani); public health consultant (Michael, Murru, Beesley)

"A voice must be given to non-state actors, usually as active in the field as they are absent in policy discussions."

Within the context of international development assistance, much of the policy analysis of fragile states focuses on the need to develop the state's capacity to provide essential health services within a viable policy framework. The research in this paper shifts that focus, instead exploring the ways in which healthcare provision is configured by multiple actors beyond the reach of the state. Drawing on a documentary analysis, site visits in 2011-2012, and interviews with key informants, the study examines 6 diverse case studies: Afghanistan, Central African Republic (CAR), Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Haïti, Palestine, and Somalia. It illustrates through these examples how healthcare provision "is becoming increasingly pluralistic, unplanned, privatized, unregulated and globalised all over the world."

  <div class="field button"><a href="https://conflictandhealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1752-1505-8-20" target="_blank">Click here to read the article online or to download it in PDF format (10 pages).</a></div>
Contacts (user reference): 
Source: 

Conflict and Health 2014 8:20. https://doi.org/10.1186/1752-1505-8-20. Image credit: Health Systems Global

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