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Impacts of Engaging Communities Through Traditional and Religious Leaders on Vaccination Coverage in Cross River State, Nigeria

Impacts of Engaging Communities Through Traditional and Religious Leaders on Vaccination Coverage in Cross River State, Nigeria

Author: 
Angela Oyo-Ita
Xavier Bosch-Capblanch
Amanda Ross
Patrick Hanlon
Afiong Oku
Ekperonne Esu
Soter Ameh
Bisi Oduwole
Dachi Arikpo
Martin Meremikwu
Publication Date
Wednesday, July 1, 2020
Affiliation: 

University of Calabar (Oyo-Ita, Oku, Esu, Ameh, Meremikwu); Effective Health Care Alliance Program, Calabar (Oyo-Ita, Esu, Oduwole, Arikpo, Meremikwu); University of Basel (Bosch-Capblanch, Ross, Hanlon); Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Bosch-Capblanch, Ross, Hanlon); Achievers University (Oduwole)

"Policymakers need to consider interventions that drive demand for vaccination to ensure optimal uptake of vaccination even among the possible resistant groups in the community."

A 2017 survey showed that only 21% of children 12 to 23 months of age are fully vaccinated in Nigeria. Several reasons contribute to low coverage, including poor parental knowledge and attitudes. In Nigeria, previous studies have shown that engaging traditional and religious leaders (TRLs) as agents of change to tackle misguided parental norms about polio vaccination improved uptake. TRLs are respected in their communities as opinion-shapers and guides in religious, social, and family life. This study, funded by the International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3Ie), evaluated a multi-component intervention that involved training TRLs to engage communities in the planning, implementation, and monitoring of immunisation services in Cross River State, Nigeria.

  <div class="field button"><a href="https://www.3ieimpact.org/sites/default/files/2020-07/TW10.1073-Nigeria-TRL.pdf" target="_blank">Click here for the 53-page report in PDF format.</a></div>
Contacts (user reference): 
Source: 

3ie website, July 24 2020; and email from Angela Oyo-Ita to The Communication Initiative on July 26 2020. Image credit: World Health Organization (WHO) Nigeria

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