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[2018 Update] Face to Face Interventions for Informing or Educating Parents about Early Childhood Vaccination

[2018 Update] Face to Face Interventions for Informing or Educating Parents about Early Childhood Vaccination

Author: 
Jessica Kaufman
Rebecca Ryan
Louisa Walsh
Dell Horey
Julie Leask
Priscilla Robinson
Sophie Hill
Publication Date
Tuesday, May 8, 2018
Affiliation: 

La Trobe University (Kaufman, Ryan, Walsh, Horey, Robinson, Hill); The University of Sydney (Leask)

"There is low- to moderate-certainty evidence suggesting that face-to-face information or education may improve or slightly improve children's vaccination status, parents' knowledge, and parents' intention to vaccinate."

The aim of this Cochrane Review was to find out whether face-to-face information or education delivered to parents or expectant parents improved vaccination status, parental knowledge or understanding of vaccination, attitudes or beliefs about vaccination, or intention to vaccinate. This review originated as a part of the Communicate to Vaccinate (COMMVAC) project (2010-2016), which sought to build evidence for communication interventions related to childhood vaccination. This topic was selected through an international priority setting exercise because face-to-face communication is widely used around the world, can be implemented in a range of settings, and can be adapted or tailored for different populations.

  <div class="field button"><a href="http://cochranelibrary-wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD010038.pub3/full" target="_blank">Click here to read the review online or to download it in PDF format (115 pages in full).</a></div>
Contacts (user reference): 
Source: 

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2018, Issue 5. Art. No.: CD010038. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010038.pub3 Image credit: japantimes.co.jp

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