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Vaccination Confidence and Parental Refusal/Delay of Early Childhood Vaccines

Vaccination Confidence and Parental Refusal/Delay of Early Childhood Vaccines

Author: 
Melissa B. Gilkey
Annie-Laurie McRee
Brooke E. Magnus
Paul L. Reiter
Amanda F. Dempsey
Noel T. Brewer
Publication Date
Friday, July 8, 2016
Affiliation: 

Harvard Medical School & Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute (Gilkey); University of Minnesota (McRee); University of North Carolina (Magnus); The Ohio State University (Reiter); Adult and Child Centered Outcomes Research and Dissemination Science (ACCORDS) Program, University of Colorado Denver (Dempsey); University of North Carolina (Brewer)

The Vaccination Confidence Scale is an 8-item, 3-factor scale that measures beliefs related to the perceived benefits of vaccination, the perceived harms of vaccination, and trust in vaccine providers. Originally created to assess parental beliefs related to adolescent vaccination, the scale was found in a prior study to be useful in understanding vaccine refusal and vaccination status for vaccines in the adolescent platform. In this second validation study of the scale, the researchers used data from a nationally representative sample of United States (US) parents to assess associations between vaccination confidence and vaccine refusal, vaccine delay, and vaccination status for vaccines administered in early childhood. The goal is to support ongoing efforts to understand and increase the public's vaccination confidence so as to reduce vaccine refusal and delay across the life course.

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Contacts (user reference): 
Source: 

PLoS ONE 11(7): e0159087. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0159087

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