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Nutrition Behaviour Change Communication Causes Sustained Effects on IYCN Knowledge in Two Cluster-Randomised Trials in Bangladesh

Nutrition Behaviour Change Communication Causes Sustained Effects on IYCN Knowledge in Two Cluster-Randomised Trials in Bangladesh

Author: 
John Hoddinott
Akhter Ahmed
Naureen I. Karachiwalla
Shalini Roy
Publication Date
Monday, August 7, 2017
Affiliation: 

Cornell University (Hoddinott); International Food Policy Research Institute, or IFPRI (Ahmed, Karachiwalla, Roy)

"Impacts of BCC programmes may be underestimated if persistence of effects is unaccounted for."

This paper assesses the effect of nutrition-sensitive social protection interventions on infant and young child nutrition (IYCN) knowledge in rural Bangladesh, both during and after intervention activities. In that country, chronic under-nutrition is widespread: 36% of children under 5 years old are stunted, leading to poorer preschool nutrition outcomes, and subsequently, to poorer health, education, and labour outcomes in adulthood. Behaviour change communication (BCC) has been found to improve IYCN knowledge, practices, and health outcomes. An under-researched question, particularly for intervention design, is the appropriate duration of BCC and whether knowledge gained from BCC persists.

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Contacts (user reference): 
Source: 

Maternal and Child Nutrition 2018; 14:e12498. https://doi.org/10.1111/mcn.12498 - sourced from "Nutrition behavior change communication causes sustained effects on infant and young child nutrition knowledge", by Evgeniya Anisimova, CGIAR Research Program on Policies, Institutions, and Markets (PIM), August 18 2017 - accessed on February 15 2018. Image caption/credit: Bangladeshi mothers receiving information about maternal and child health and nutrition. Bread for the World. Photo by Todd Post

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