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Recent Knowledge on Soul Beat

PMI VectorWorks and Breakthrough ACTION are pleased to announce the launch of itnuse.org, an interactive website that pulls together the latest data on trends in the use of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs). Building on VectorWorks’ ITN Access and Use Report, the new website includes additional analyses of ITN use among those with access to an ITN and looks at geospatial, seasonal, age, and gender trends.

The findings help to identify groups that are using their nets at high rates as well as groups that are not using them consistently, allowing programs to prioritize resources and focus social and behavior change strategies accordingly.

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PMI VectorWorks and Breakthrough ACTION are pleased to announce the launch of itnuse.org, an interactive website that pulls together the latest data on trends in the use of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs). Building on VectorWorks’ ITN Access and Use Report, the new website includes additional analyses of ITN use among those with access to an ITN and looks at geospatial, seasonal, age, and gender trends.

The findings help to identify groups that are using their nets at high rates as well as groups that are not using them consistently, allowing programs to prioritize resources and focus social and behavior change strategies accordingly.

read more

PMI VectorWorks and Breakthrough ACTION are pleased to announce the launch of itnuse.org, an interactive website that pulls together the latest data on trends in the use of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs). Building on VectorWorks’ ITN Access and Use Report, the new website includes additional analyses of ITN use among those with access to an ITN and looks at geospatial, seasonal, age, and gender trends.

The findings help to identify groups that are using their nets at high rates as well as groups that are not using them consistently, allowing programs to prioritize resources and focus social and behavior change strategies accordingly.

read more

Sexual Violence Research Initiative (SVRI) forum is the world’s key research conference on violence against women and other forms of violence driven by gender inequality in low and middle-income countries.

The forum will focus on research working to understand and redress inequity among vulnerable populations to ensure no-one is left behind; research on violence against women and linkages to violence against children, realising the SDGs and research for social change and global movements.

Location: Cape Town, South Africa

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Hi folks - just a quick note to let you know of a webinar tomorrow (as I write), August 21, 2019. The focus is on Effective Community Entry Processes: How to Build Partnerships with Communities. The webinar commences at 9-30am EDT.

During this webinar and discussion, the presenters will engage the audience in a discussion on how to develop rewarding partnerships with communities, guided by lessons they have learned along the way.

Please see further details and joining instructions at this link.

 

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PMI VectorWorks and Breakthrough ACTION are pleased to announce the launch of itnuse.org, an interactive website that pulls together the latest data on trends in the use of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs). Building on VectorWorks’ ITN Access and Use Report, the new website includes additional analyses of ITN use among those with access to an ITN and looks at geospatial, seasonal, age, and gender trends.

The findings help to identify groups that are using their nets at high rates as well as groups that are not using them consistently, allowing programs to prioritize resources and focus social and behavior change strategies accordingly.

read more

Sexual Violence Research Initiative (SVRI) forum is the world’s key research conference on violence against women and other forms of violence driven by gender inequality in low and middle-income countries.

The forum will focus on research working to understand and redress inequity among vulnerable populations to ensure no-one is left behind; research on violence against women and linkages to violence against children, realising the SDGs and research for social change and global movements.

Location: Cape Town, South Africa

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Author: 
David W. Brown
Xavier Bosch-Capblanch
Lora Shimp
Publication Date
Friday, March 15, 2019
Affiliation: 

Brown Consulting Group International LLC (Brown); Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Bosch-Capblanch); John Snow Inc (Shimp)

"New thinking and creative, collaborative solutions are needed to address existing challenges confronting HBRs and to expand and improve the availability of documented evidence of vaccination history and other child survival interventions."

This opinion piece supports and extends prior efforts on the part of its authors to advocate for renewed energy and attention towards improving documented evidence of vaccination history.

  <div class="field button"><a href="http://www.ghspjournal.org/content/ghsp/early/2019/03/15/GHSP-D-18-00431.full.pdf" target="_blank">Click here for the 6-page article in PDF format.</a></div>
Contacts (user reference): 
Source: 

Global Health Science and Practice. Mar 2019, GHSP-D-18-00431. doi: 10.9745/GHSP-D-18-00431 - sent via email from David Brown to The Communication Initiative on March 17 2019. Image credit: Home-based Record Repository

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Author: 
Louise Dalton
Elizabeth Rapa
Sue Ziebland
Tamsen Rochat
Brenda Kelly
Lucy Hanington
Ruth Bland
Aisha Yousafzai
Alan Stein
Communication Expert Group
Publication Date
Saturday, March 16, 2019
Affiliation: 

University of Oxford (Dalton, Rapa, Hanington, Stein, Kelly, Ziebland); University of Witwatersrand (Stein, Bland, Rochat); University of Bath (Stein); Human Sciences Research Council (Rochat); Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (Kelly); Helen & Douglas House (Harrop); Institute of Health and Wellbeing (Bland); University of Glasgow and Royal Hospital for Children (Bland); and Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health (Yousafzai)

It can be difficult for healthcare professionals treating adults with a life-threatening condition to raise the issue of children's understanding of parental illness and the importance of communicating with them about the illness. Parents are often uncertain about how, when, and what to tell their children about the condition, and are fearful of the effect on their family. There is evidence that children are often aware that something is seriously wrong and want honest information. This Lancet review - one in a series (see Related Summaries, below) - considers children's awareness and understanding of their parents' condition, the effect of communication around parental life-threatening condition on their wellbeing, factors that influence communication, and the challenges to achieving effective communication. Children's and parents' preferences about communication are outlined.

  <div class="field button"><a href="https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(18)33202-1/fulltext" target="_blank">This 13-page article is available by subscription or purchase only. Click here to access an abstract and more information.</a></div>
Contacts (user reference): 
Source: 

The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10176, P1164-1176. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(18)33202-1 - sent via email from Barbara Kolucki to The Communication Initiative on March 15 2019.

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AMAZE and AMAZE Jr. together constitute a suite of online (video) resources created as part of a communication initiative leveraging technology to deliver sexual health information to younger adolescents and children - as well as their parents and educators - around the world. Developed through a partnership between Advocates for Youth, Answer, and Youth+Tech+Health, this initiative is designed to meet the needs of those aged 10-14 (AMAZE) and 4-9 (AMAZE Jr.) for age-appropriate, scientifically accurate, positive, and rights-based sexuality education information and resources that are grounded in gender equality. The underlying message is that you and your body are amazing just the way they are.

Communication Strategies: 

Guided by a group of engaged youth advisors who have provided input at every stage of the campaign, this initiative draws on what are meant to be creative, edgy YouTube videos that seek to help children and young adolescents develop the healthy attitudes, knowledge, and behaviours they need to navigate the critical transition between childhood and older adolescence. Available on the website(s) as well as on a dedicated YouTube channel, the videos highlight issues around body image, healthy relationships, puberty, and sexual health. Materials are also available for parents and educators on the AMAZE website in tandem with each video, including lesson plans for educators and conversation starters and videos for parents.

The work is based on what the AMAZE team sees as the 5 "must haves" of health resources, including: humour, youth narration, colours and music, organisation, and professionalism. AMAZE worked with design schools to identify a group of animation students or graduates and also hosts frequent calls for expressions of interest from young animators. Each young animator is given a content brief and has a mentor from one of the partner organisations who assures the material is accurate and age appropriate.

AMAZE also seeks to be a resource for the adults who care about children and youth. For example, the AMAZE Jr. parents' playlist is a series of videos designed to help parents understand the common questions children have and gain the comfort and confidence needed to effectively respond. Concurrently, organisers produced video playlists for parents to watch with their young children. In each, animated characters share life's lessons and respond to the questions and concerns young children have about body parts, gender, and reproduction. Together, these resources can equip parents to talk with their children early and often.

AMAZE supports regional and sub-regional initiatives in East and Southern Africa and Latin America, in partnership with regional and in-country organisations. Partner organisations select AMAZE videos for adaptation, informed by local needs, existing sexuality education resources, and consultations with adolescents as well as other stakeholders including parents and teachers. In addition, partner organisations develop new videos on occasion, such as one on boys' puberty developed in Mexico and one on considerations for disclosing HIV status, developed in South Africa. In addition, AMAZE responds to incoming requests to adapt, dub, or sub-title AMAZE videos, resulting in numerous collaborations across several countries, such as in South Korea and Japan. Further, a core set of 10 videos is available with subtitles in Arabic, Bengali, French, Hindi, Mandarin, Portuguese, Punjabi, Spanish, Russian, Swahili, Urdu, and Vietnamese.

The team expects to continually update the videos and topics to meet the needs of children, adolescents, parents, and educators. The videos are published under the Creative Commons License and are available to be viewed, free of charge, by anyone. Viewers are encouraged to republish or incorporate the content into other work, to submit suggestions, or to reach out to the AMAZE team if there is interest in sub-titling, dubbing, adapting, or creating new videos.

Development Issues: 

Children, Youth, Sex Education.

Key Points: 

In many countries around the world, there are renewed efforts to eliminate or restrict comprehensive sexual education programmes - that is, sex-ed curricula that don't just rely on abstinence-only education but also build life skills and teach about consent, healthy relationships, sexual violence, pregnancy and contraception, sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV, and sexual orientation and gender identity. Several scientific studies and medical papers have shown that sex ed makes teens more well-equipped to navigate sex and relationships in their present and future. Yet, sex ed curricula are often fear-based and fail to provide contraception instruction. Furthermore, the taboos around talking about sex still affect what information gets shared in schools. "Controversial" topics like queer sexuality, trans and non-binary identities, and even something as basic as contraception or the pleasurable aspects of sex are often left out of school sex education.

In that context, some have wondered whether online platforms like AMAZE are the future of sex education. And if so, will they one day replace school-based sex education altogether? Some note that, for all benefits of online sex education, there are issues such as that of access: While school-based sex education meets kids where they are, online sex education requires young people to actively seek it out - and to be able to differentiate trustworthy sources from the vast amount of questionable information that also exists online. A combination of classroom-based and online sex education is a way forward that has been explored.

Partner Text: 

Advocates for Youth, Answer, and YTH (Youth+Tech+Health) - with international partners as listed here.

Contacts (user reference): 
See video
Source: 

Emails from Nicole Cheetham to The Communication Initiative on February 5 2019 and February 6 2019; and AMAZE, href="https://amaze.org/za/" target="_blank">AMAZE South Africa website, AMAZE Jr., "9 sex myths that teens - and adults - are still asking about", by Rachel Kraus, Mashable, September 24 2018, and "Is sex ed in schools obsolete?", by Lux Alptraum, Splinter, October 27 2016 - all accessed on February 5 2019. Image credit: CommonSense.org

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